Friday August 9, 2013 – HOME MADE KAZOKU kindly took a moment from their busy schedule for a press conference. After a brief introduction of the members, the conference was underway.

Q:  What music are you guys listening to right now?

KURO: I listen to old music, old soul music. Curtis Mayfield, Marvin Gaye.

MICRO: I listen to Bruno Mars, I love his melodies.

U-ICHI: Jay Z.

MICRO: We saw them last night.

Q: How was that?

MICRO: It was awesome!

Q: What was it like starting out in the beginning?

KURO : We went to the same school, MICRO and I. We were hip-hop dancers, we started Japanese rapping and we didn’t have a DJ then. We met U-ICHI at a bar, and we started hanging out together. We didn’t imagine that we could go this far.

MICRO: Starting from 1996.

Q:  What have been the hardest challenges given the genre of music that you’ve chosen?

MICRO: Japanese is more… complicated. It’s harder to fit the words to the rhythm. So that’s hard, but also the most interesting part.

Q:  Who are some of the inspirations that you’ve had in the rap genre?

KURO: Zeebra, he’s a famous Japanese rapper. And here maybe, A Tribe Called Quest, The Pharcyde.

Friday August 9, 2013 – HOME MADE KAZOKU kindly took a moment from their busy schedule for a press conference. After a brief introduction of the members, the conference was underway.

Q:  What music are you guys listening to right now?

Kuro: I listen to old music, old soul music. Curtis Mayfield, Marvin Gaye.

MICRO: I listen to Bruno Mars, I love his melodies.

U-ICHI: Jay Z.

MICRO: We saw them last night.

Q: How was that?

MICRO: It was awesome!

Q: What was it like starting out in the beginning?

KURO : We went to the same school, me and MICRO. We were hip-hop dancers, we started Japanese rapping and we didn’t have a DJ then. We met U-ICHI at a bar, and we started hanging out together (3:50) We didn’t imagine that we could go this far.

MICRO: Starting from 1996.

Q:  What have been some of the hardest challenges given the genre of music that you’ve chosen?

MICRO: Japanese is more… complicated. It’s harder to fit the words to the rhythm. So that’s hard, but also the most interesting part.

Q:  Who are some of the inspirations that you’ve had in the rap genre?

KURO: Zeebra, he’s a famous Japanese rapper. And here maybe, A Tribe Called Quest, The Pharcyde.

Q: What’s the craziest thing you’ve seen in this industry, whether  it was a professional thing or something your fans have done for you… the most outlandish thing that you’ve witnessed?

KURO: The time we had a gig at Budokan. Budokan is a place I think almost every Japanese artists wants to perform there once in their life. That view was amazing, that was very crazy.

Q: So you’ve performed at Budokan and you’re abroad now, where do you see yourself expanding/going in the future?

KURO: Having a tour in the States.

Q: This is your second time at OTAKON, what differences are you finding compared to the first one?

KURO: One difference is that we’re here with T.M. Revolution, and hopefully we’re going to have a collaboration with him.  Also the stage is pretty huge compared to before, so we’re really excited.

Q: Who are some other people that you’d like to collaborate with; what’s your dream crew or person you’d like to collaborate with?

KURO: In Japan, Hikaru Utada.

MICRO: And Bruno Mars!

– laughter –

MICRO: He has a lot of fans in Japan.

– Here a member of the press recalled his knowledge of Hikaru Utada, naming her popular hit Sakura Drops, and mentioning her work with the popular video game series, Kingdom Hearts. –

Q: As musical artists what are some of the major goals that you hope to achieve?

MICRO: To keep on running and keep on doing our shows, making new songs. In the music industry it’s pretty hard to survive right now, all the music is free downloads, but I think it’s not such a bad influence because everybody has a chance to listen and if that song was great they’ll buy it, then they’ll go to the show. So what’s important for us to do is to keep making more songs.

– At this point, a press member interjected a reference of how artists such as a PINK and Radiohead have offered music for free download, merely asking fans to pay what they feel it’s worth if they enjoy it. –

Q: Are there any different genres that you’ve like to incorporate into your music? Something different like techno or jazz or something like that?

KURO: Swing Jazz. Swing Jazz would be great.

Q: So going back to PINK and Radiohead who gave out music as “pay-what-you-will”, are you guys familiar with Pandora radio station?

Translator: We have things kind of like this in Japan, but downloading and buying the CD are the main way to listen to music right now.

Q: What do you guys think of streaming radio?

KURO: Still it’s a good movement because they can listen to our music. I think it’s good.

MICRO: Like on YouTube, the sound is not so great.

Q: No, It’s not – are you guys familiar with Bandcamp?

KURO: I’ve heard of it.

– Here came a brief discussion as a press member as he explained the concept and features of bandcamp –

MICRO: Watching on YouTube, the sound on some songs is awful. For us, making music we want people to hear it with great sound. Free or not, it doesn’t matter; we just want people to listen with a great quality of sound.

Q: I know when the earthquake and tsunami happened in 2011 you did a lot of charity work to help. Do you have any more plans in the future?

MICRO: We’re still doing the charity party, a lot of artists doing the gig together, and the money from the tickets goes to Tohoku. We’ll keep on doing it every year and just never forget.

KURO: We’re going to make a new song with other musicians as well.

– A press member took to a moment to describe some of the charity projects that he was familiar/involved with –

KURO: To keep doing it is the most important thing.

Q: Can you guys tell us about any individual side projects, collaborations that you’re doing outside of HMK?

MICRO: For me I’m not thinking about doing solo right now because we’re focusing on our anniversary. We want to have a big party in our hometown; Aichi in Nagoya city. That’s the most exciting thing that I’m looking forward to.

KURO: Well maybe since U-ICHI is good at making films he could make movies! A documentary of HOME MADE KAZOKU

– Everyone responded with interest –

With that final question everyone said their goodbyes, shaking hands and expressing their gratitude for their time, they were all very kind.


Find out more about HOME MADE KAZOKU at their [ Official Homepage ]


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Transcription written by Alicia R. Thomas. Thank you so much to HOME MADE KAZOKU, Sony Music Entertainment and OTAKON for making this opportunity possible!

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